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Archive for the ‘Annex Community Events’ Category

Weird Gardening Terms You Need to Know

Monday, August 6th, 2018

There are still a few good months to go in our efforts to manage and maintain our lawns and gardens.

While simply keeping on top of your vegetable garden and grass trimming can be work enough, August is a good time to get to know your garden a little better. So let’s explore those vaguely familiar, weird-sounding lawn-and-garden chores that you can begin applying. Who knows? Maybe you’ll find one you really like doing.

Deadheading:

This, quite simply, is the process of removing dead or dying blossoms from flowers and shrubs. The purpose for doing so is that it encourages the growth of more blooms.

Aerating:

This process pokes small holes in your grass so that air, water and nutrients can more easily penetrate the grass roots. This makes your grass stronger and greener.

Dethatching:

If healthy grass is important to you, you may want to take this step. Thatch is that layer of dead grass that sinks down into the soil line. As thatch builds, it prevents water and nutrients from leaching down into the roots.

Aphids:

These small insects are likely not an avid gardener’s favourite creature. Aphids suck sap from plants and they can cause heavy-duty damage to plants, shrubs and crops.

Biodegradable:

This word applies to natural substances that break down or decompose quickly thanks to the work of microorganisms. Food, leaves, wood, paper and cotton are all examples of biodegradable products.

Dibble:

These smallish tools might save your finger nails as the point makes holes in the ground for seeds, plants or bulbs.

Heirloom:

When plants are called heirloom, this refers to old fruit, flower and vegetable plants that have been grown by gardeners and farmers since before World War Two. These plants are generally grown in small-scale operations.

Hydroponics:

This is the art and science of growing plants without soil.

Irrigation:

This essentially means delivering water to your lawn and garden. When you sprinkle water on your flowers, whether with a watering can or hose, though there are many other methods, you are irrigating.

Symbiosis:

This is the relationship that occurs when life forms interact with each other. Sometimes it is beneficial, sometimes not. For example, marigolds release a chemical that wards off a type of worm. Beneficial, right?

Succulent:

All the rage right now, this often thick and fleshy type of plant retains water in dry climates.

Xeriscaping:

This is a type of water-saving garden that works well in drought conditions. Native flowers, plants and shrubs are ideal for this as they are accustomed to our climate. These gardens tend to be less maintenance and attract birds and beneficial insects.

A Kaleidoscope of Summer Fun

Tuesday, July 31st, 2018

Summer in the GTA is all about enjoying outdoor events and activities. From al fresco patios and window shopping to biking trails and evening strolls, the warm weather prompts us to move outside for three or four months each year.

Is it any wonder that the GTA is home to such a wide assortment of open-air events, festivals and activities? Let take a look at some:

Lights, Camera, Action – You don’t need to be a movie nerd to enjoy these celebrations dedicated to cinema. The Open Roof festival runs each Wednesday until August 22 and celebrates independent film and music. Located at Castlepoint Numa on Stirling Road in the Lower Junction, tickets are $15.

The Christie Pits Film Festival goes until August 19 and showcases unusual depictions of cities and their residents from around the world. Screenings begin at sundown and a suggested donation of $10 is requested. Films will be shown on August 5, 12, 18 & 19.

The Mulan International Film Festival runs from August 10 to 17 and showcases Chinese-language films. Tickets are $15 and the films are screened at the Isabel Bader Theatre on Charles St. W.

Have Your Fill – This is a great city if you enjoy food, even greater if you appreciate foods from around the globe. And the food festivals are there to show it. Here goes:

  • 3 to 6 is The Toronto Food Truck Festival at Woodbine Park
  • 3 to 6 is Scarborough Ribfest at Thomson Memorial Park
  • 4 is Taste of the Middle East Food Festival at Yonge-Dundas Square
  • 5 is Taste of India Food Festival at Nathan Phillips Square
  • 9 to 12 is Grace JerkFest at Centennial Park
  • 10 to 12 is Pickering Food Truck Festival at The Esplanade N
  • 10 to 12 is Waterfront Night Market, a Pan-Asian food and lifestyle festival at Ontario Place
  • 10 to 12 is Taste of the Danforth on Danforth near Pape Ave.
  • 10 to 11 is Feast of St. Lawrence at St. Lawrence Market
  • 11 to 12 is Toronto Vegandale Food Drink Festival at Garrison Common
  • 11 to 12 is Sweetery Toronto Food Festival at David Pecaut Square
  • 11 is the Richmond Hill Craft Beer Festival in support of Rotary at the Richmond Hill Centre for the Performing Arts
  • 17 to 19 is the Oshawa Rotary Ribfest at Lakeview Park
  • 18 to 19 is Richmond Hill Food Truck Festival at Richmond Green
  • 18 to 19 is the Markham Craft Beer & Wine Festival at Markham Fairgrounds
  • 24 to 25 is The Toronto Cider Festival at Sherbourne Common
  • 24 to 26 is Beer, Bourbon & BBQ at Ontario Place
  • 25 to 26 is the Panamerican Food & Music Festival at Yonge-Dundas Square
  • 25 to 26 is the Japan Festival Canada at Mississauga Celebration Square
  • 31 to Sept. 3 is The Mac + Cheese Festival at Woodbine Park
  • 31 to Sept. 3 is the Hispanic Fiesta at Mel Lastman Square

Entertainment, Arts & Culture – If music, dance, arts and culture are more your thing there is plenty on tap:

The Toronto Summer Music Festival runs until Aug. 4 at Koerner Hall, while the Toronto International Youth Dance Festival is at Nathan Phillips Square from Aug. 3 to the 4th. You can soak up Caribbean music at Island Soul at Harbourfront Centre from Aug. 3 to 6. From Aug. 10 to 12th catch Habari Africa, a festival celebrating the sights and sounds of African culture, at Harbourfront Centre. The TD Markham Jazz Festival goes from Aug. 17 to 19 on Main Street, Unionville in Markham.  Try the Small World Music Festival at Harbourfront Centre from Aug. 17 to 19. How about the Festival of South Asia on Gerrard Street East near Coxwell or the Chinatown Festival, both on Aug. 18 and 19th? The Korean Harvest Fest is at Mel Lastman Square Aug. 24 to 26, while Tamil Fest is being held in Scarborough on Markham Road on Aug. 25 and 26. Don’t forget the Ashkenaz Festival at Harbourfront Centre Aug. 28 to Sept. 3 or the International Buskerfest for Epilepsy at Woodbine Park on the same dates.

 

 

 

 

Seaton Village Hosts D-I-Y Music Festival June 9

Wednesday, June 6th, 2018

Open Tuning is a free music festival being offered this Saturday, June 9th in the heart of Toronto’s west end.

Amped up by the success of previous festivals, this will be the fifth annual event for Open Tuning and Freeman Real Estate is happy to be a part of the festivities. The family-run boutique firm has been a fixture on Bathurst Street for nearly five decades so when there is opportunity to give back to the community, the Freemans enjoy doing so. This year, Freeman is sponsoring Freeman Laneway Stage, which will feature some of the many great bands playing at the festival.

“This is our second year participating in Open Tuning,” says Dan Freeman, senior vice president and broker of Freeman Real Estate. “We enjoy these kinds of events as they allow us the opportunity to meet neighbours and those who live and visit the neighbourhood. More importantly, though, we like participating because it’s a way of giving back to the community that has been so good to us.”

The streets of Seaton Village will come alive this Saturday with live music, in a variety of genres, playing at unique venues throughout the neighbourhood. The festival seeks to celebrate live music and the many ways we understand it: creating music, performing it, experiencing and listening. Musicians young and old, from various musical genres and experience levels are invited to perform at the various venues which include front porches, parks, alleyways, garages and street corners.

“I think what’s neat about this festival is the grassroots, sort of democratic approach it takes,” Freeman says. “No matter what your experience is with music you can get up and perform, providing you register first, of course. Who knows? I may even consider it.”

This year’s line-up of acts includes the Fourteen Hens Band from 2 to 3 p.m., the Governor Douglas Band from 3 to 5, Tyler Simmons from 5 to 6 and from 6 to 7:30, the Storm Free Band.

Last year’s event welcomed more than 100 artists at over 20 different venues within Seaton Village. Musicians included first timers and professionals such as members of Toronto’s Broken Social Scene and Jane Siberry.

The festival began in 2014 thanks to a group of area residents, who were inspired by a similar event known as Fete de la Musique, which is held in Paris, France.

Open Tuning is entirely volunteer-driven with no paid advertising or corporate sponsorship.

Seaton Village is just west of the Annex and it bounded by Bloor and Dupont and Bathurst and Christie Streets.

 

Plan Your Garage Sale

Thursday, April 19th, 2018

Is this the year you finally cut the clutter? Are you keeping a list and checking it twice in the hopes your home will once-and-for-all be a model of organization envied by all? Does the thought of downsizing give you a bad case of jitters?

You’re not alone and that’s why thousands of Canadians from coast to coast begin planning their spring and summer garage and yard sales now. Here’s how to pull it off:

Talk to Neighbours:

A multi-family sale is better than a single-family sale. Buyers rightly think the pickings are better and they’re correct. There is simply more to choose from. You will likely have more traffic as a result. Rally your neighbours early on and get them excited and involved in the process. Be sure to delegate some of the chores such as signage or entertainment to your neighbours.

The Gathering:

Round up your stuff and store it in a little-used room or garage. Go through your house with a very critical eye. Do I really need 13 butter knives? Will I ever use those barrels I’m storing at the side of my house? Take a serious look at your possessions and ask yourself if they are still serving you well or are they just taking up space?

Sign, sign, everywhere a sign:

You don’t want to forget yours. Unless you live on a busy, well-trafficked street, the only way folks will discover your sale is with signage that points them in the right direction. Make it big, bright and clear with a minimum of words. Your realtor may also offer garage sale signs so talk to them first. Don’t forget other forms of advertising, too. You could try promoting your sale in a newspaper, though that can be pricey. Put up flyers at your local grocery store and library. And finally, be sure to post info on social media sites.

Safety & Security:

Keep even your back door locked during your sale as you just never know who’s lurking around. Don’t use a cash box. Instead, carry your money with you at all times. Keep your curtains and blinds closed during your event and you may want to post a sign that says, ‘No public restrooms.’ As an alternative, figure out where the nearest public washroom is so you can point folks in the right direction.

The Price is Right:

You’re best to put a price on everything rather than have bargain hunters ask about every last item. For small miscellaneous items place bits and pieces of similar value in a box or container of some sort. You could display a 50 cent bin, and bins marked with a one dollar, two dollar and five dollar price tag. It’s said that a good gauge is to price stuff at about 20 per cent of what you paid for it. So if you bought that salad bowl for $10 then you would ask $2 for it.

Get into the Groove:

You want to create a warm and welcoming atmosphere for the shoppers. That way, they will be more at ease and potentially more likely to part with their money. Play upbeat music in the background. Have bottled water for sale. If you’re really into it, you could do a barbecue with hotdogs or another crowd pleaser and donate some of those proceeds to a local shelter or non-profit children’s organization. Above all, greet shoppers and be friendly. Make small talk if they’re amenable but don’t follow them around or watch them shop. That kind of behaviour makes them nervous.

Celebrate Mother Earth

Wednesday, April 11th, 2018

Did you know the first Earth Day was marked 48 years ago in 1970? To help celebrate this April 22nd observance, why not head outdoors and do something green?

Begin with your own property. By now, hopefully winter’s assault is over and what you’re left with is the promise of spring mixed with the remains left by snow, ice and freezing temperatures. Take a mental inventory and begin to prioritize what needs tending first.

Prune dormant trees, non-flowering shrubs and vines such as wisteria, clematis and climbing roses. Rake up leftover curled fall leaves caught in your flower beds, shrubs and hedges. Now is the time to feed your garden so try an organic fertilizer on trees, vines, roses and other plants. Trim summer-blooming shrubs such as hydrangea. Also don’t forget to divide perennials that have grown too big.

April is also a good time to begin trying to keep weeds at bay. According to Mark Cullen, weed control comprises a four-step approach:

  1. Kill them when they’re young.
  2. Mulch is so effective at preventing weeds. It’s also not a chemical and easy to apply. Cullen says the secret is to apply four to five centimetres of finely ground up cedar or pine bark mulch. The sooner this is done, the better.
  3. For grass weeds, he recommends removing all loose debris from the area and getting grass blades to stand up on end. Smoothly rake on three to five centimeters of lawn soil or triple mix. Use quality grass seed on the area. Rake it smooth and then step on the patch to ensure the seed comes in contact with the soil and water until germination. Keep it damp and be sure to fertilize.
  4. Consider trying biologically based weed killers.

Once your lawn and garden is spring ready you may want to tackle the neighbourhood. Consider organizing a spring clean-up on your street or in your community. It’s likely in desperate need of a polish what with coffee cups, dog poop and plastic bags now on full display now that the snow is gone.

The city is also encouraging spring cleanup with drop-off depots for items such as electronics, books, dishes and toys. Beginning April 7 in Scarborough-Rouge River and Parkdale-High Park wards will take turns hosting these Community Environment Days until the end of July. Free compost collected thanks to the city’s yard-waste program is also available.

According to the CBC.ca, about 200,000 volunteers from Toronto schools, businesses and community groups participate in Community Cleanup Days, which are local city-run events that clean up public spaces. They take place from April 20—22.

 

Second Annual GREAT TURKEY GIVE

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Freeman Real Estate is reprising its community giving this holiday season with a charitable gift that is even bigger and better than last year’s.

The family-run boutique realtor is stepping up its contribution to the community this year on Sunday, December 17 with a GREAT TURKEY GIVE that will see some 9,000 pounds of turkey given to members of the public on a first-come, first-served basis.

This is the second annual turkey giveaway for the Bathurst Street realtor, which launched the GIVE in 2016 as a way of giving back to the community and keeping the tradition of Ed Mirvish alive.

Freeman is located at 988 Bathurst Street, just four blocks north of the former Honest Ed’s store, which gave away free turkeys during the holidays for many years. Freeman is a company with a reputation for supporting community causes, charities and interests.

“For over 40 years, starting with my father, the Freeman family has been practicing real estate at this very location on Bathurst Street,” says Elden Freeman, Broker of Record. “The community we serve means a lot to us. Giving away turkeys is our way of saying thank you, engaging with those we serve and hopefully inspiring others to spread generosity and goodwill during the holiday season.”

Freeman has partnered with Bathurst Street organizations Spirit of Math, 918 Bathurst and A Nerd’s World for the giveaway. Spirit of Math is a leader in after-school mathematics education. Located in the Annex, 918 Bathurst is a centre for culture, arts, media and education. A Nerd’s World is a one-stop shop for all your online marketing needs.

The turkeys are completely free of charge and for each turkey given Freeman plans to donate to St. Alban’s Boys & Girls Club, an organization that offers programming for children and youth.

On hand to help give away the turkeys will be Toronto city councilors Mike Layton, Joe Mihevc, Joe Cressy and a number of other political figures and local celebrities.

The GIVE begins at 9 a.m. at Freeman Real Estate located at 988 Bathurst Street.

 

 

Happy to Pick Up Where Honest Ed’s Left Off

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

turkeybannersmall

Freeman Real Estate is launching a brand new community event this month that pays tribute to the memory of a much-loved retailing icon and honours the Freeman Real Estate spirit of community giving.

On Sunday, Dec. 18, Freeman is hosting a free turkey giveaway at the real estate company’s office at 988 Bathurst Street. The event, which begins at 12 noon, will see 500 turkeys given away to members of the public.

Located just four blocks north of Honest Ed’s, Freeman Real Estate is a family-run boutique real estate firm with a reputation for supporting community causes, charities and efforts. Honouring Ed Mirvish’s memory and the real estate company’s tradition of community giving helped plant the idea for the turkey giveaway.

“We always admired Ed’s charity and we thought this was a good opportunity for us to keep the tradition going,” says Elden Freeman, Broker of Record.  “We’re big believers in our local community. As residents and business persons, we benefit a good deal from our community. This is one way we can pay back and say thank you.”

Spirit of Math is also getting into the holiday spirit by sponsoring a portion of the gobbler giveaway.  Spirit of Math is an innovative leader in after-school mathematics education with more than 40 campuses in North America.

The turkeys are completely free of charge and for each turkey given away Freeman will donate 50 cents to St. Alban’s Boys & Girls Club, an organization that provides programming for children and youth.

On hand will be Ward 20 city councillor Joe Cressy. St. Alban’s executive director Chris Foster and boys and girls from the club will also be there to help give out the turkeys.

The Annex landmark, Honest Ed’s, gave away free turkeys at Christmastime for 28 years, ending the tradition this year. The retailer at Bathurst and Bloor Streets will close in 2017 to make way for condos and commercial space.

If this year’s giveaway is a success, Freeman intends to make the event bigger and better for next year.

A Neighbourhood Goes for Green

Friday, April 29th, 2016

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The Harbord Village Residents’ Association (HVRA) is aiming to imprint a great big collective green thumb on its neighborhood by replacing concrete and asphalt with plants, grass and trees.

Harbord Village, which is bordered by Bloor, College, Spadina and Bathurst Street, is a neighbourhood that while lush with greenery and private gardens has little public green space, except for three tiny parkettes. The residents’ group decided to approach the city about developing a green plan and with the input of the Harbord and Bloor Annex BIAs, the 2015 Harbord Village Green Plan was born.

“We’ve done the plan and now it’s a matter of mobilizing the community,” says Tim Grant, chair of the association. “We already have an active effort on Croft Laneway where neighbours there have already gotten together and planned three different plantings scheduled for this spring. It’s neighbours helping neighbours and I hope to use that as a model to encourage others.”

The 600-plus member association hooked up with city councilor Joe Cressy in addition to local BIAs to devise its plan, which includes the greening of street corners, laneways, planters and derelict and under-used areas in the neighbourhood.

The first plan of attack addresses the often unoccupied paved space where residential streets meet commercial strips along Bloor, Harbord and College. The green plan calls for planting opportunities at 13 different locations in which in-ground planting, raised container beds, bicycle parking and seating might be provided.

As Harbord Village is home to over 25 laneways, the plan calls for a number of initiatives aimed at improving and greening the neighbourhood’s network of corridors and passages, with current emphasis on Croft Laneway and Sussex Mews. These include encouraging neighbours to plant containers in free spaces next to garages or in paving gaps along building walls, hanging flowering baskets from light standards where appropriate, creating punctures along the centre of laneways and introducing resilient plant species, introducing vining along walls and fences and seeking opportunities for rain barrels and other catchments to provide water.

The plan recommends the replacement of pitchpoint planters. These concrete planters, many of which are marked with graffiti, are only marginally effective at slowing motorists. The residents’ group would rather see an in-ground pitchpoint, which allows ample space for plants, shrubs and trees. These in-ground street features effectively slow traffic and discourage graffiti.

The development of parks in under-capacity parking lots, abandoned recreational courts and sections of surplus lawn around apartment buildings all have potential when it comes to green space.

On May 18, the HRVA is holding its annual spring meeting at the Kensington Health Centre at 45 Brunswick Ave.

“We’re excited about this,” Grant says. “Now we need to get boots on the ground and make things happen.”

 

 

 

Hibernate No More!

Monday, January 25th, 2016

It’s easy to understand why Torontonians want to crank up their heat and stay indoors during January and February. But don’t let cool temperatures and a little snow accumulation prevent you from exploring the city.

Despite the chill, there are plenty of fun and fascinating events taking place. Here’s our look at some of the more unique ones:

New Height for Rooftop Skating Rink

top

There is something decidedly exciting about skating outdoors but when you’re gliding amidst other towering rooftops there’s an added kick. Check out Molson Canadian’s 100-by-45-foot ice pad set 32 stories high atop the financial district at 120 Adelaide St. W. You can purchase ice time between January 29 and February 7.

The Hills are Alive with Toboggans

Toronto has a surprising number of great spots, from baby hills for real beginners to steep cliffs that only old seasoned sledders can navigate. Cedarvale Park, Winston Churchill Park, Christie Pits and Bickford Parks all offer good variety in terms of different size hills.

Winterlicious

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One of the city’s favourite foodie festivals gets underway January 29 and runs to February 11. Winterlicious offers delicious cuisine and unique culinary events at more than 200 restaurants. For more details, see website for details .

Want Fries With That?

La Poutine Week is the crème de la crème of fried foodie festivals that begins Feb 1 and goes to Feb. 7. For $10, you get to try a poutine dish from participating restaurants and then vote on the best Poutine Week location.

Spot of Tea

tea

If your tastes fun a bit more refined, perhaps you’d enjoy exploring the world of tea at the Toronto Tea Festival. The two-day event at the Toronto Reference Library takes place January 30 and 31. A one-day pass is $15; two-day pass is $25. For more info, click here.

Try the Castle on for Size

Casa Loma offer two popular escape games for the adventurous at heart. Blending fact with fiction and gaming with theatre, the escape games offered here – Escape from the Tower and King of the Bootleggers – require advanced bookings. If gaming isn’t for you, consider the January 23 Robbie Burns celebration which includes a four-course Johnnie Walker scotch pairing dinner. See website for more.

 

 

Come Skate With Us

Monday, December 7th, 2015

skate

Freeman Real Estate is once again inviting the community it serves to join its realtors, managers and owners for a free skate this weekend at the Bill Bolton Arena on 40 Rossmore Road in Toronto.

The free skate takes place on Saturday from 5:15 to 6:15 p.m. Refreshments will also be served.

A fixture within the business community of Seaton Village and Toronto’s independent real estate brokerage firms, Freeman has a long-standing tradition of community outreach and giving thanks to the clients and customers it has proudly served since 1972.

“The span of time we’ve spent on Bathurst Street has been good to the Freeman family,” says Elden Freeman, president of Freeman Real Estate. “And I think that goodness funnels back to the customers we’ve acquired in real estate. This is one small way we can show our gratitude and wish all of our clients and customers a Merry Christmas.”

The Freemans enjoy staging local community events year round and have organized historic tours of noteworthy neighbourhoods and sponsored dance performances as well as educational seminars that are open to the public.

Bear in mind that skating is great exercise because it’s easy on your joints and terrific for improving balance, coordination and muscle strength. You can also burn calories on ice skates. Be sure to dress in warm, light layers so you can adjust your clothing depending on how hot or cold you feel. You may want to consider a helmet as well.

Since space is limited at the free skate, you’re best to RSVP your intention to participate at frontdesk@freemanrealty.com or call at 416-535-3103.

See you on the ice!

 

The data included on this website is deemed to be reliable, but is not guaranteed to be accurate by the Toronto Real Estate Board. The trademarks REALTOR®, REALTORS® and the REALTOR® logo are controlled by The Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) and identify real estate professionals who are members of CREA. Used under license.